Thursday, October 4, 2018

We live in an age when skim reading seems to be the new normal, and so we’re in constant danger of skimming ourselves to death. Certainly some books ought to be skimmed. . . But if we aren’t careful, our ability to do deep reading will become a constant and losing struggle.

Karen Swallow Prior

Dark morning.

The door in the bedroom is no longer open to the night air, instead, the hum of the furnace comforts. I sip soy milky frothy coffee from the comfort of my bed while the Yorkie snores and the husband heads off to early morning men’s meeting. I order two books because we are heading into reading season (coming out of reading season . . . in reality, every season is reading season).

The noise of the world is too loud for me just now. I’ve sensed it for some time. Now I recognize physical manifestations for what they are; the knowledge a gift, as I grant myself permission to enter a season of intentional hibernation from the din.

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I pop over to my private journal and work through some thoughts. Set some intentions. And return.

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Today we are taking a date day. It will involve pulling out the now-barren tomato trees in the garden and a drive to enjoy autumn’s finest showing. And more. Or perhaps less. But just enough.

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I’m looking forward to Canada Post delivering Karen Swallow Prior’s Booked: Literature in the Soul of Me and On Reading Well: Finding the Good Life Through Great Books.

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Would you tell me, in the comments, what you’re thinking about in this start of the dark season? What’s holding your attention? What you’re letting go of?

Word wrangler. Photo taker. I'm here early every morning with one of my photos and a few simple words. | Nulla dies sine linea: not a day without a line. | Soli Deo gloria: to the glory of God alone.
6 comments
  1. I seldom skim books. Often I take notes and re-read passages, which I suspect you do as well.

    But first of all, I choose good books, those I think may deserve a 5-star rating.
    This morning I put two good books (I hope!) on reserve at the library. 🙂

    1. I’m returning to physical books from years of reading exclusively on the Kindle because I believe I retain more through reading a book I can hold, mark up as appropriate, and have an experience with. I read on my Kimdle at night before bed, and in the wee hours when sleep is elusive. Curious about those two good books you just put on hold. 🙂

      1. Two books suggested on a friend’s website: Parker Palmer’s On the Brink of Everything and How to Live by Judith Valente

        1. I downloaded samples of both of those books too (I do love that feature on Amazon.) I like the library option though…going to request them here too.

  2. I had a blog for eight years that spanned our time as Miss in South Africa, our return, dealing with a friend’s cancer and death then a turn to poetry. This week I deleted it. I was tired of the weight I felt to keep it up to date.
    My desire also this hibernating season is to read and write more.

    1. Hi Debbie. Seasons come, amd seasons go. Sounds like you’re settling in, with intention, to the season that is yours at this time. There’s much wisdom in letting go of what no longer serves us (like your blog, perhaps?) and embracing what is to come.

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